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California Northstate University Pharmacy School–Coming Soon to Elk Grove

This topic contains 18 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  EGrez 5 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #174416

    LC
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    I got hooked up with an insider for this one, so my information is only as good as the source. Fairly highly placed person.

    This is the pharmacy college that made a big splash two years ago that was supposed to open in the old AAA building at Elk Grove Blvd. and I-5. When nothing was happening I tried to contact someone there last year and got radio silence. Then we learned they did not have their accreditation firmed up. Now they do.

    Currently they are in Rancho. What we didn’t understand is that this school is not an expansion; it’s a full relocation. There will be two schools; the pharmacy school, followed by the nation’s first private medical school. This isn’t ITT tech–the students are required to have a Bachelor’s Degree and they will graduate as registered pharmacists.

    My source tells me that May 2014 is their target opening date for the pharmacy school, with the medical school following next year. Like the pharmacy school, the medical school, once it become operational, will be granting MD degrees–not medical techs. I assume they will also be offering PA programs too.

    Last summer the Business Journal had a summary of their progress, although they weren’t able to get much information. I hope mine is accurate–I think the source is good enough that it should be.

  • #263131

    doclaguna
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    Hmmm. Not sure how the medical school is going to work. The first 2 years are instructional/classroom, and that could be done there. But the next 2 years are spent in clinical rotations. This requires a hospital, usually a tertiary care center, such as UCD Med Center. So I am really unclear where these med students are going to get this training. Will it be at UCDMC? How would that work, with them having their own medical school?

  • #263139

    newmom
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    Good for our local economy. Any idea on the perspective number of students taking classes on any given day?

  • #263146

    Ila
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    There has been activity in the building for a few weeks now, I drive by it everyday to get home. They at one time had picketers out there on the corners of Elk Grove Blvd and W. Taron objecting to the school for some reason, never had time to fully read the signs so not sure what the reason was.

  • #263133

    LC
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    No, and I didn’t ask the question and will later. I think the pharmacy school was projected at around 900.

    DocL–I have no idea. I might be able to get an answer to that too. Honestly, I don’t know how far along with the medical school they are. This has been a tough road for these guys, I do know that. What do the Guadalajara graduates do? Residency in Mexico or local?

  • #263134

    LC
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    @ila 91853 wrote:

    There has been activity in the building for a few weeks now, I drive by it everyday to get home. They at one time had picketers out there on the corners of Elk Grove Blvd and W. Taron objecting to the school for some reason, never had time to fully read the signs so not sure what the reason was.

    That was the Carpenters Union. They picket every major job that doesn’t use all union labor. I asked one of the guys with the blow up doll what their gripe was and he had no idea. He was hired to hold it–no affiliation with the union. Bet it was minimum wage too.

  • #263140

    newmom
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    Yep, the wonderful Carpenters Union. They are famous for that. A couple of months ago a guy was sitting in a chair with a banner “protesting” outside my father’s assisted living place, saying the don’t pay union wages. The people that work there are all so wonderful and are treated and paid very well. There is little to NO turnover there as a result, which is meaningful considering that many of the jobs there are unskilled-kitchen staff, waitstaff, janitorial staff. In the 6 months my father has been there I’ve also seen people get promoted and switch departments too, so there are opportunities for advancement.

  • #263142

    tomwaltman
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    I don’t get the location of the pharmacy school here. UOP has one of the finest pharmacy programs in the US. Why would anyone want to compete with them? Oh, well…

  • #263141

    newmom
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    I think there is a difference between the quality of the student and the price of the program with this school, unless they are graduating pharmacy techs rather than pharmacists and LC’s info is incorrect.

  • #263135

    LC
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    Pharmacy schools are all overcrowded and the competition for the better schools is cutthroat, so I hear. That’s the short answer. It’s a pretty high paying job. You start at just over $100K with a retailer. Retailers and HMOs hire the majority, but drug companies hire for R&D too. I think the unemployment rate for pharmacists is about 0%.

    I don’t UOP is ranked all that well, nationally, around 50 from what I see. UCSF and USC are the big dogs in CA.

  • #263143

    tomwaltman
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    Yeah, pharmacists make pretty good money, and never lack for jobs. The CPhA has done a pretty good job in keeping the profession free of “off-brand” factory-minted pharamcists. They are probably all conflicted about the potential for hundreds of new members that come with the potential to be poorly trained…

  • #263132

    doclaguna
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    I don’t know what you meant about private medical school. Do you mean non-university affiliated, because I went to a private medical school.

    In the end, expect this to be the new norm. No one is going to want to do medicine, especially primary care. The quality of the people going into the field with drop.

  • #263136

    LC
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    I don’t know what you meant about private medical school. Do you mean non-university affiliated, because I went to a private medical school.

    My error. Private, for profit.

    I think there is a difference between the quality of the student and the price of the program with this school, unless they are graduating pharmacy techs rather than pharmacists and LC’s info is incorrect.

    No, that much is correct. Here are the admission requirements.

    I don’t know the length of the program. I think graduating from pharmacy school can range from 2-4 years depending on the pre-reqs satisfied coming in.

    If that’s correct, then I can see a housing need in the area too. It could really perk up that district.

    Fees? Ouch. And x 2-4 years. Especially for a non ranked school. I guess it probably doesn’t matter too much for pharmacy.

  • #263147

    ErinO
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    Students who go to pharmacy school and earn a PharmD receive a doctorate level education. It worries me that this school is for profit. They are motivated by profit to pass their students and confer degrees. Seems like a conflict of interest that could result in professionals who have PharmD’s but aren’t qualified for the work they do.

    Is this really a boon for our area? For-profit colleges don’t have the greatest reputations. Students who cannot meet the acceptance criteria for schools in the US often turn to for-profit schools in other countries to obtain their education. Mostly this has been with medical schools. Students who are rejected by every medical school they apply to in the US, usually have no problem getting into a for-profit school in the Caribbean. All they need is money to pay for their tuition. Does that generate the best professionals? There is a reason why it is difficult to get into pharmacy and medical school. These are difficult programs and not everyone has the aptitude. That’s why the screening process is so rigorous. You shouldn’t be able to just circumvent that process with money. And unfortunately, a lot of these students who seek for-profit educations don’t even HAVE the money. They amass huge debts and then cannot complete their education program, probably because they were not suited to it in the first place.

    Now students don’t even have to go out of the country to do it. Just come to Elk Grove. How is that good for our area?

  • #263145

    SteveB6509
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    The UOP Pharmacy program is in San Francisco.

    I generally agree that for-profit schools tend not to be the greatest but a professional school would fall under a different category.

    When I was doing my MBA at UC Davis, they were transitioning to a revenue-neutral program and are now revenue positive. Thus, they are essentially a profit center within a non-profit. The UCLA MBA program has done the same thing.

  • #263137

    LC
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    It’s no different than National, U of Phoenix, DeVry, etc. All of these are questionable academically when compared to not for profit counterparts that get state funding or private donations. The for profits don’t. Are the instructors capable? Dunno, they have doctorates from somewhere.

    Is there a difference in the debt load between a for profit and a not for profit? I think most grad students in these disciplines pay their own way, be it cash or financed. As far as quality output, you’ve got think it’s not going to be on the same level as a top or middle ranked school. How much that matters for pharmacy probably depends partially on the employment. I’d bet a lot of these grads will work for the state or counties.

    Erin, before you get too critical about for profit schools, look into where the funding goes for non-profits. I understand the concern, but one who assumes the motives behind the administration for not for profits is somehow superior to the for profits is extremely naive.

    Why would added day population not be good for the area? These aren’t parolees, they’re college grads trying to get trained in respectable professions.

  • #263148

    ErinO
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    @lc 91898 wrote:

    It’s no different than National, U of Phoenix, DeVry, etc. All of these are questionable academically when compared to not for profit counterparts that get state funding or private donations. The for profits don’t. Are the instructors capable? Dunno, they have doctorates from somewhere.

    Is there a difference in the debt load between a for profit and a not for profit? I think most grad students in these disciplines pay their own way, be it cash or financed. As far as quality output, you’ve got think it’s not going to be on the same level as a top or middle ranked school. How much that matters for pharmacy probably depends partially on the employment. I’d bet a lot of these grads will work for the state or counties.

    Erin, before you get too critical about for profit schools, look into where the funding goes for non-profits. I understand the concern, but one who assumes the motives behind the administration for not for profits is somehow superior to the for profits is extremely naive.

    Why would added day population not be good for the area? These aren’t parolees, they’re college grads trying to get trained in respectable professions.

    That’s true. The American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine is owned by, guess who? DeVry! So yeah, not much difference.

    I don’t think the debt load is different. The problem appears to be that students at for-profit schools aren’t qualified for the program. So they then drop out at a much higher rate than their counterparts at non-profit schools (who were fully vetted in the admissions process and have a higher chance of success), after amassing hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. The biggest difference, of course, is that they AREN’T doctors, so their earning potential isn’t that of a doctor and they have a hard time paying the educational debt. I think it’s a bit shady for these schools to accept students who have a low probability of succeeding into their program, and then take hundreds of thousands of dollars from them, knowing they likely won’t finish.

    I wasn’t suggesting that the students are somehow degenerate. I was suggesting that the for-profit educational business is.

    I hope I’m wrong. I might be, because apparently I’m extremely naive.

  • #263138

    LC
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    Try this, then. Say you apply to UOP and UCLA pharma schools. You have a 3.8 GPA. Chances are you won’t make it. UCLA pharma isn’t highly ranked but I think it’s about a 1 in 6 acceptance. Your goal is to work for a retailer. In your career universe, a pharma degree is a pharma degree, especially when there’s a shortage of pharmacists. CVS doesn’t really care where you went; the salary is the same. It’s like getting a doctorate from LaVerne in education when you’re already in the system. It’s the same salary credit as a doctorate from USC. The local school, maybe even in your home town of Sacramento, that admits you makes some sense. Because you don’t get into a ranked school in this discipline doesn’t mean you’re not going to come out with your degree as prepared for CVS as the next person. If your goal was high level R&D with a pharma corp the outcome may be different.

  • #263144

    lizzie
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    I a, happy about this!

  • #263149

    EGrez
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    @steveb6509 91897 wrote:

    The UOP Pharmacy program is in San Francisco.

    I generally agree that for-profit schools tend not to be the greatest but a professional school would fall under a different category.

    When I was doing my MBA at UC Davis, they were transitioning to a revenue-neutral program and are now revenue positive. Thus, they are essentially a profit center within a non-profit. The UCLA MBA program has done the same thing.

    You’re incorrect. UOP’s pharmacy school is in Stockton. I have family members who graduated within the last few years as well as one there now.

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